Awards

The John Hurst Award for the best undergraduate dissertation in medieval archaeology

The John Hurst Award will be made annually to the undergraduate dissertation that makes the most original contribution to medieval archaeology (from AD c.400 to c.1600), submitted to a United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland university.
 
Each institution is invited to submit the dissertation of their best candidate who completed their degree during the academic year 2013-14 to Dr Aleks McClain by August 1st 2014. The dissertations will be read by Dr Aleks McClain and the Society’s Secretary (Prof. Dawn Hadley), with short-listed dissertations also being read by one of the Society’s Honorary Vice-Presidents. The winner will be offered one of the Society’s recent Monographs (to be chosen by the winner) and £100. The other short-listed candidates will be commended. Submissions should be sent as a PDF, either on a CD sent by post to Dr Aleks McClain, Department of Archaeology, University of York, King’s Manor, York YO1 7EP or by email to aleksandra.mcclain@york.ac.uk

 

The Martyn Jope Award for the best novel interpretation, application of analytical method or presentation of new findings

In 2007, with Volume 51, the Society introduced an annual award of £200 for the best novel interpretation, application of analytical method or presentation of new findings published in its journal. The Editorial Committee of the Society considers all articles and notes for eligibility, and the President makes a presentation at the December AGM, very shortly after publication of the award-winning paper.
 
For more information about contributing to the journal, please see the Instructions for Authors on our publisher’s website, particularly the guidance on approaching the Editor with suggestions for publication, and the annual submission deadline of 28 February (unfortunately we cannot guarantee to consider late submissions for the award).

 

The Philip Rahtz Award for the best postgraduate dissertation

The Philip Rahtz Award,  for the best postgraduate dissertation in medieval archaeology, will be made annually to the postgraduate (taught Masters) dissertation that makes the most original contribution to the study of medieval archaeology (from AD c.400 to c.1600), submitted to a United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland university. The prize is intended for students studying for a taught postgraduate Masters qualification, in which a dissertation of no more than c. 20, 000 words is submitted as part of the coursework (NB students studying for a Scottish undergraduate degree that results in an MA qualification should be considered for the John Hurst dissertation prize; this Philip Rahtz Award is not intended for the theses produced during a research Masters (such as MPhil or MRes) in which the bulk of the assessment comprises a single, longer dissertation). If you have any questions about the eligibility of potential candidates please contact Prof. Hadley (D.M.Hadley@Sheffield.ac.uk).
 
Each year, Institutions will be invited to submit the dissertation of their best candidate who completed their degree in the preceding calendar year by April 1st. The dissertations will be read by a panel made up of the Society’s Council members. The winner will be offered £250 and free attendance at the Society’s annual conference in September at which the award will be made. The other short-listed candidates will be commended.
Submissions should be sent as a PDF to: Prof. Dawn Hadley, Honorary Secretary of the Society for Medieval Archaeology, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, Northgate House, Sheffield, S1 4ET